Craft Projects

Driftwood and Sea Glass chime

My girlfriends and I got together for craft night last weekend, and, as always, we had a great time. Carrie came up with the idea to make driftwood and sea glass chimes (if you can call them that).  After a delicious dinner and a bottle of wine, we began to tackle our craft.

We started with individual pieces of driftwood that Carrie collected on a family vacation. Apparently she was teased for collecting the wood — I think it was a fabulous idea, don’t you?

Sea Glass driftwood

Once we picked which piece of wood we wanted, I got started on mine. Originally, I started to make mine with fishing wire. I got really frustrated with that, so I made mine with wire and chain. So to start my chime, I wrapped wire around each end of the driftwood and secured it around itself to create a hook to hang the finished chime from. Carrie and Amy used twine for this, and it worked great. It also looked really nice.

Like I said, I started mine with fishing wire. We watched a tutorial from Martha Stewart, and even she commented that the fishing wire was a pain. Clearly she, Carrie and Amy all have more patience than I do, because they made it work. I think the reason our wire wasn’t super easy to work with was because it was a bit thicker, so if you want to try this project on your own, I definitely recommend using a thin fishing line.

If you want to use fishing line, Carrie and Amy both did theirs differently. Carrie tied knots around each piece of sea glass and sealed the knot with super glue. Amy, on the other hand, avoided the knots and simply glued the wire to the glass with the super glue. She said one piece fell off at home, but it is holding up well.

Sea Glass

Like I said, I got sick of the fishing wire and the knots, so I broke out the jewelry wire and chain. Sometimes working with a familiar material is just better.

After I created a handle to the driftwood, I lined the sea glass up in an ombre pattern. I ended up only using half of these, but you get the idea.

Sea Glass1

Then, I wrapped each piece of sea glass with wire, creating a loop at the top to attach it to the chain.

Sea Glass2

Once all of my glass was wrapped with wire, I attached each piece to one of my three chain strands. Then, to finish the chime, I attached the chain to the piece of driftwood using jewelry wire.

Sorry for the cruddy picture and the not-so-in-depth tutorial. It’s a girls’ night first and foremost, so blogging has to come second!

Anyway, here’s the finished product!

Sea Glass finished

I love the colors of the glass, and now I want to go hunting for drift wood and real sea glass (these were from Michaels).

Sea Glass chime

Have a great day!

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Christmas, Craft Projects, Gift Idea, Holiday, Pallet Projects

Mini Anchor Sign

One of my really good friends love to sail and is soon to be sailing a boat in the Caribbean with her hubby — what a neat vacation idea!

I wanted to make her something for Christmas so I grabbed a leftover piece of pallet wood and brought it inside to make a sign with an anchor on it.

Pallet wood is really…. splintery. So I sanded and sanded and sanded. And when I thought I was finished, I wasn’t, so I sanded some more.

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When the wood was smooth enough to work with, I sketched an anchor onto it. It wasn’t pretty, but it was good enough.

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Nice anchor, huh? I didn’t care about the terrible sketch because I filled the entire thing with gray and black paint. Then, I wrote her last name on the sign.

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With the sign painted, I needed to drill holes big enough to pass a small rope through, so I busted out the drill and created two holes at the top.

Then, I used a water-based stain to color the wood. I’ve never used water-based stain before, but I like it a lot. The wood soaks it up right away and there is a huge variety of colors to choose from. The color I picked for the sign was Minwax’s Driftwood stain.

I only used one coat for the small sign, then I let it dry overnight.

Then next day I touched up some of the paint, mainly the black lines, and added rope and an anchor button so my friend could hang her sign.

Here’s the finished product:
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I gave her the sign yesterday and she really liked it. Yay!
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Craft Projects

Jewelry Holder: Glass knobs

Look what I brought home from work!?! We just had 42 boxes of our alumni magazine delivered a couple of weeks ago on this beauty of a pallet. I quickly called “dibs” on the pallet (no one else wanted it… can’t imagine why) after the delivery guy left and took it into my office, where it happily resided for a couple of weeks. I finally took it home last Friday, and was originally going to use it as nail gun practice. But, when I started to mess around with it, I changed my mind and quickly crafted a new plan.

I pulled out my jigsaw and started cutting off a few of the boards. I took them inside to sand them down a bit and decide exactly what I wanted to create.

Once my board was smooth, I cut it down the middle where the two screws held it to the middle support board of the pallet — right through the holes!

I sanded, sanded and sanded some more until my half boards were super smooth.

Next, I stained a piece of wood a light shade of gray before applying a coat of poly to the top. I let it dry overnight. Then, I screwed in three adorable glass knobs (four if you count the one I shattered by tightening the screw too much… oops) and attached a ribbon.

With that, I had a totally recycled jewelry holder — wood, knobs and all! I literally didn’t have to buy a single supply for this project — I had everything sitting around in my craft room, and, of course, my free pallet. Bahaha, that’s the best kind of craft! So excited.

I think I’ll have to make a few more of these for that Trash to Treasure fair, don’t you think?

Spoiler alert — I already made a second one, but the hangers are so much cooler. Check back later to see it!

One last thing… Here’s a fun fact, for all of you people who are on the lookout for pallets — they aren’t the nicest thing in creation. The wood is jagged and splintery, the screws are warped and they are often falling apart…. but man are they fun to work with if you get the chance! There are two sitting in our loading dock right now that I am oh so tempted to take, but I think I’ll finish tearing this one up first :p